10/8/2015

Just like dogs are “human’s best friend” I am all animals’ best friend. In other words, I love animals. (Well, except for birds that decide to scream- chirp their heads off- in the morning.) Despite birds and their ignoring quirks, I still disagree with animal testing. In my opinion, if we are afraid to test it on humans, we should  not test it on animals. Yes, I do realize that it could potentially help humans, but frankly, I find animal testing inhumane.

My parents always taught me to treat others as I would treat myself. Extending that to animals, organisms that can feel pain and process happiness (dogs seeing their owners actually get a rush of dopamine) deserve to be treated well. If we do not feel comfortable with applying testing to humans, we should not apply them to animals. I mean, testing on animals is no longer necessary and they are not the best subjects to test on in general. With in vitro (in glass) testing, such as studying cell cultures in a petri dish, can produce more relevant results than animal testing because human cells can be used. In addition to this, animals that are not human obviously have a different genetic make up- making them bad subjects to test on. For example, aspirin was almost not allowed for humans because of the sickness they caused in animals. In addition to this, thalidomide, a drug that was supposed to treat morning sickness, passed animal testing but then caused awful birth defects in children born to mothers who took it.

On top of this, if a drug passes animal testing, humans still have to be tested before it is released to the pubic. If this is the case, why even test on animals? Humans signing up for the testing should know what they are getting into. Testing on animals is just a waste of money. If we chose to test on humans, we would immediately know the effects new drugs have on humans, without the costs of the upkeep of animals.

Animal testing should not be allowed to continue. However, knowing the world we live in today, I know that this probably will not happen for awhile. If I cannot ask for the end of animal testing, I ask for a better quality of life for the animals being testing on. They deserve to be treated better than most of them are now.


Works Used:

http://animal-testing.procon.org/

http://www.aboutanimaltesting.co.uk/using-animals-testing-pros-versus-cons.html

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10/1/2015

As my friend puts it, “On the race to zero, my bank account has my GPA beat.” College is expensive, especially if you plan on going to a a four year institution. Here in America, we are trying to achieve the American dream: prosperity, success, and upward social mobility for our family. How are all of these “ideals” defined today? By having a successful, well paying job (or by previously being rich). Now, how does one get a job like that? They go to college, of course! What if they can not pay? They just work, or, well, they take out a loan; just a little something that they will have to pay off for a significant amount of time. Wait, what if they do not need to go to a 4 year institution for the job they want? What if they just need like a 2 year education? They still have to pay, and in today’s America, most can not get as good as an education at a 2 year college than at a 4 year university.

Put simply, I think that community college should be free. I know that some of the cons include: possibly higher taxes, paying for people who possibly do not want to be at a college, and the devaluation of the “competitiveness” for college, but, in my opinion, the pros out weigh the cons. First off, the standard for being a recipient of free community college is harder than what is required for the Pell Grant, meaning that those who want to go to community college for free actually have to work harder than those going to a 4 year institute. In addition to this, anyone who ever needed a two year degree could get one, and those who are ill prepared for a 4 year university could become better equipped and transfer at the end of the two years. Also, with “an estimated 35 percent of job openings requir[ing] at least a bachelor’s degree and 30 percent requir[ing] some college or an associate’s degree” by 2020, America will become better prepared for the future. Any policy trying to be passed by Congress or the President will have pros and cons, however, if the pros outweigh the cons significantly, are the cons really that bad?


Additional References:

http://www.usnews.com/news/articles/2015/02/23/as-he-promotes-it-some-question-obamas-free-community-college-idea

http://www.washingtonmonthly.com/college_guide/blog/thoughts_on_president_obamas_f.php

http://www.educationdive.com/news/5-pros-and-cons-of-obamas-free-community-college-plan/356289/